Teaching · Technology

Is educational technology valuable for teaching & learning?

At work, my team and I are often engaged in the task of evaluating educational technologies – for their technical functionality, information security, digital accessibility, and (the focus of this post) pedagogical value. The results of these evaluations inform the advice and support we give to colleagues as well as various decisions we make internally,… Continue reading Is educational technology valuable for teaching & learning?

Technology

A Few Holiday Commercials That Got Me Thinking

When I think about the key ingredients for holiday joy, a fairly common recipe comes to mind: sharing stories, laughter, food, and fun with family and friends. This holiday season, a few TV commercials have me reflecting on how technology is affecting some of our long-held traditions, and what that says about our current culture… Continue reading A Few Holiday Commercials That Got Me Thinking

Teaching

Relying on “Smile Scores” To Measure Student Learning Is Not a Good Idea

A recent Academic Anonymous post in The Guardian about how student surveys are affecting a young professor’s confidence got me thinking. Yes, we want students to enjoy our courses. And yes, we want students to find our instructional innovations engaging. But we can’t forget that students’ perceptions of enjoyment or engagement are not measures of… Continue reading Relying on “Smile Scores” To Measure Student Learning Is Not a Good Idea

Research

Five common pitfalls in educational research (and how to avoid them)

In April of this year, SRI published a report evaluating the efficacy of adaptive learning technologies. This report represents the culmination of a program, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, in which 14 higher education institutions set out to test nine different adaptive learning tools across 23 courses, involving more than 280 unique… Continue reading Five common pitfalls in educational research (and how to avoid them)

Research

In Praise of Social Psychology

When I was in college, I studied cognitive science. Then, I went on to graduate school and studied cognitive psychology. My postdoctoral research fellowship focused on cognitive modeling, so naturally when I became Assistant Professor of Psychology, I affiliated with the cognitive group (now called “cog/cogneuro” to include cognitive neuroscience as well). In case you’re… Continue reading In Praise of Social Psychology